Fred Harman


Fred Harman was the most widely known living western artist when the Cowboy Artists of America was organized in June 1965. While Harman was unable to join Charlie Dye, John Hampton, Joe Beeler and George Phippen in the meeting where the CAA was officially founded, he held the special designation of “charter member.” Harman was […]

Tom Ryan


“When Tom Ryan paints a cowboy, you know it is the real thing,” says one fellow artist. “You can tell just by looking at the figure that that man has been around. His horses are real cow horses. His men are real ranch hands. They always have just the right feel; there is never anything […]

E.E. “Bud” Helbig


Bud Helbig’s home state of Montana nurtured his early dreams of becoming an artist and also provided a lifetime of inspiration for his paintings and bronzes. One of his early heroes was Charles M. Russell, another Montana artist. Helbig’s annual participation in the auction at the C. M. Russell Museum in Great Falls was one […]

Bob Scriver


“It was the days of hair chaps, high-heeled boots, and spurs that jingled when they drug on the ground. All my friends were either cowboys or Indians. I didn’t know any other kind of people,” Bob Scriver said, describing his youth. Those early days would lay the foundation for Scriver’s later success as one of […]

Harvey W. Johnson


Harvey W. Johnson came by his artistic talent naturally. His father was a noted sculptor, and his mother was an accomplished painter. Following in their footsteps, after World War II, Johnson studied at the Art Students League in New York City. He worked for many advertising studios and as an illustrator (often of frontier life) […]

Irvin (Shorty) Shope


When he was still a young artist, Irvin “Shorty” Shope had the extraordinary opportunity to show his work to one of the masters of American Western art, Charles M. Russell. Like Russell, Shope lived in Montana and worked as a cowboy before beginning his artistic career. Unlike Russell, who moved to Montana as a teenager, […]

J.N. Swanson


From the vast range lands of Nevada and eastern Oregon to the pastoral oak-covered hills of California, the images in Jack Swanson’s work have an unerring realism. Swanson comes by that realism honestly. In the early 1940’s, he worked in the Tehachapi’s with the last of the great vaqueros. After World War II, he broke […]

Tom Lovell


A Native American finds a Raggedy Ann doll on a lonely Western road. A settler is teaching his gingham dressed wife how to shoot a rifle. Three Indians warm their hands over the chimney of a snow buried cabin. These are just three of the dramatic stories that Tom Lovell told through his artwork. Lovell’s […]

U. Grant Speed


Whenever a few members of the Cowboy Artists of America get together, someone will invariably try to toss a lariat around a bale of hay. Conversation often then turns to “cowboying,” stories of breaking horses, moving cattle, and mending fences; the very stuff of American Western art. Grant Speed is always in the group, because […]

Joe Beeler


Joe Beeler, a founding member of CAA, was a pioneer in the territory of contemporary Western art. He was there at the beginning of the tremendous development of that territory in the early 1960s. The key event in Beeler’s pioneering activity was the founding, in 1965, of the Cowboy Artists of America. From that association […]